ClickCease

Information

info2new

What’s The Process

A general run down of what’s included:

  • Over the phone quote.
  • Travel time (remote area surcharges apply).
  • If an animal has not been kept an eye on we allow a 30-minute search time period.
  • Capture and removal of animal/s and time spent for relocation.
info1new

Symptoms

Symptoms vary between species and not all snakebites are painful or visible. Common symptoms can include the following; strong emotional reaction, headache, double vision, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, pain or tightness in the chest/abdomen, lightheadedness, fainting, sweating, breathing difficulties and visible changes to the bite area.

First Aid

Upon any suspected snake bite, the following actions (if done immediately) will potentially save a life.

  • Have victim laying down
  • Use an entire constriction bandage to apply pressure to the immediate bite site, 5-10cm above and below.
  • Using a second pressure bandage, start at the bottom of the bitten limb and bandage upwards, about half a bandage at a time.
  • Bandage from the bottom of the limb to the top, using any excess bandage to overlap downwards again. Repeat this step 2 – 3 times. For a leg, wider bandages are recommended.
  • If bandages are not available sheets, towels, clothing, etc may be torn into strips to form a bandage.
  • Splint & immobilise the bitten limb to prevent movement of the blood. Keep the victim at rest, & bring transport to the victim.
firstaid2

What to do on Sighting

  • DO NOT PANIC – STAND STILL

    Snakes don’t like sudden and fast movements as it makes them feel threatened. With a jumpy &/or physical response a snake will feel threatened and therefore what to defend itself. If you are still, a snake is more likely to go straight past you, ignoring your presence as you are perceived not to be a threat.

  • KEEP CALM & DON’T INTERFERE

    Snakes can move with remarkable speed- whilst trying to protect or defend themselves. 95% of people who end up in hospital with snake bite are those who have tried interfering with the snake. On a short burst, a snake can move faster than a human & strike well above the knee line.

  • IF POSSIBLE

    Especially if the snake is in a building or home, try to seal off/block and or isolate the area where the snake is and try once again to keep a visual on its movements until a professional trained person arrives.
    For animals less than 30cm/12inches you may be able to isolate the animal by placing a flat rimed bucket or bin over the top of them on a flat surface if safe and confident to do so. This may be important to prevent the animal getting into inaccessible areas e.g. behind inbuilt carboards etc. Also by using a long-handled broom you may be able to gently and slowly sweep/encourage the animal into an open or safe area!

  • UPON ANY SUSPECTED SNAKE-BITE

    One should immediately apply first-aid and call for an ambulance on 000. All bites must be treated ASAP as a matter of urgency.

  • SLOW MOVEMENTS

    Once the snake/threat has moved on, slowly back away to a safe distance of 5 metres while trying to maintain an eye one the animal. Phone for assistance or call out for help as snakes are deaf, alert someone who can then make a call while you try maintaining a visual.

  • REMOVE

    Any children and pets from the danger slowly making sure they are isolated from the danger.

  • DON’T TRY TO KILL THE ANIMAL!

    Apart from placing yourself in danger it could well possibly be a harmless legless lizard which Australia has quite a few species of and at times sadly be mistaken for a snake.
    Australia has some of the world’s most venomous land snakes. The bite from an Eastern Brown Snake (which carries the 2nd most venomous bite in land snakes to date – worldwide) has caused fatality within under 15 minutes of said bite. Unlike you see in movies – 2 puncture marks may not be visible. There may be multiple puncture or scratch marks (as snakes have other teeth in their mouth & not just fangs), or it may be a slight scrape mark- hardly even visible to the naked eye just breaking the top surface of the skin & leaving a trace of venom to absorb through. Even when a snake is dead the venom crystalizes in the fang groove & remains toxic.

brownsnake

Eastern Brown

also known as Common Brown

  • The Latin name for the Eastern Brown, Pseudonaja textilis, translates to “false cobra” due to the way the snake’s head flattens during a threat display
  • Found in a variety of habitats throughout eastern Australia.
  • Eastern Browns are currently responsible for the highest amount of snakebite-related fatalities in Australia, with as lethal bite that can kill in as little as fifteen minutes.
  • Carries the second most dangerous venom of land snakes world wide.
  • Can come in a variety of colour phases, including cream through to black, orange and silver.
  • The Eastern Brown is oviparous, laying up to thirty eggs which hatch between January and April, the hatchlings measuring about 22cms.
  • Will grow to an average length of 1.5m in Adelaide and surrounding areas, but has been found up to 2.4m.
  • The snake is diurnal and it’s most common food source is rodents, often found in residences all over Adelaide and surrounding areas.

Red-Bellied Black

Pseudechis porphyriacus

  • Featuring iridescent black scales on it’s back, the Red-Bellied Black’s most distinguishing feature are the redish scales on it’s belly.
  • Usually located near fresh waterways, where they’ll feed on amphibians yabbies, fish, birds and small mammals.
  • The red-Bellied Black snake is ovoviviparous, meaning the egg sacks hatch within the female, as it;s being laid or shortly after. Clutches range in size anywhere between five to forty young.
  • Grows to an average length of 1.5m, but has been found in excess of 2m.
  • The bite of this snake is not known to be fatal, but can cause loss of limb and serious secondary infections.
snake2
pygmy

Pygmy Copperhead

Austrelaps labialis

  • Most commonly a slate grey in appearance, with a distinctive creamish barring around the lips.
  • Usually associated with fresh water sources due to an amphibian and lizard based diet. Generally well hidden.
  • The Pygmy Copperhead is a rare and endangered species of snake, growing to about 75cm.

Eastern Tiger Snake

Notechis scutatus scutatus

  • Comes in a large variety of colours, and may be banded or unbanded
  • Was once responsible for the largest amount of fatal snakebites in Australia
  • Usually found around fresh water, where it feeds on frogs, ground & nesting birds, small mammals and lizards.
tiger
bluetonguelizard

Blue-Tongue Lizard

Tiliqua scincoides scincoides (Eastern)

  • Commonly found in the gardens of homes, feeding on snails, slugs, insects and soft fruits.
  • When threatened, the Blue-Tongue lizard sticks out it’s blue tongue hisses loudly puffing itself up. Although considered harmless, if provoked, the animal can inflict a painful bite.

Legless Lizards

  • Found in yards close to the hills and plains legless lizards feed on spiders and other insects. They’re often confused with juvenile snakes, if there’s any confusion about the identity of the animal you’re dealing with, please contact Snake-Away Services for professional advice.
leglesslizard
info2

Myths & Facts

  • Lizards don’t deter snakes – they’re more often a food source for a snake.
  • Some snakes are faster than a human in short bursts.
  • All snakes can swim exceptionally well.
  • A snake’s venom is only a modified form of their saliva used to kill and help digest it’s food, not to kill us.
  • Snakes shed their skin approximately every six to eight weeks depending on the frequency of feedings.
  • Snakes are NOT cold and slimy, they’re warm and silky to the touch.
  • Snakes are ectothermic.
  • All snakes are cold-blooded, they rely on the elements to control their body temperature.
  • If confronted in close proximity to a snake stand still and wait for the snake to move on, watching where it goes from a safe distance.
  • A snake has a forked tongue, whereas lizards (including legless lizards) have a single, broad, fleshy tongue and ears.

Handy Hints

  • Wear good leather gloves when gardening
  • Don’t put your hands where you can’t see
  • Stack firewood, iron and timber off the ground
  • Turn compost heaps regularly
  • Prevent rodents from breeding on your property
  • Keep lawns, grass and weeds cut to a minimum
  • Snakes will come out on warm nights, so use a torch when walking around your property
  • Move pet water bowls away from doorways
snake1
What's The Process
info2new

What’s The Process

A general run down of what’s included:

  • Over the phone quote.
  • Travel time (remote area surcharges apply).
  • If an animal has not been kept an eye on we allow a 30-minute search time period.
  • Capture and removal of animal/s and time spent for relocation.
Symptoms and First Aid
info1new

Symptoms

Symptoms vary between species and not all snakebites are painful or visible. Common symptoms can include the following; strong emotional reaction, headache, double vision, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, pain or tightness in the chest/abdomen, lightheadedness, fainting, sweating, breathing difficulties and visible changes to the bite area.

First Aid

Upon any suspected snake bite, the following actions (if done immediately) will potentially save a life.

  • Have victim laying down
  • Use an entire constriction bandage to apply pressure to the immediate bite site, 5-10cm above and below.
  • Using a second pressure bandage, start at the bottom of the bitten limb and bandage upwards, about half a bandage at a time.
  • Bandage from the bottom of the limb to the top, using any excess bandage to overlap downwards again. Repeat this step 2 – 3 times. For a leg, wider bandages are recommended.
  • If bandages are not available sheets, towels, clothing, etc may be torn into strips to form a bandage.
  • Splint & immobilise the bitten limb to prevent movement of the blood. Keep the victim at rest, & bring transport to the victim.
firstaid2
What to do on Sighting

What to do on Sighting

  • DO NOT PANIC – STAND STILL

    Snakes don’t like sudden and fast movements as it makes them feel threatened. With a jumpy &/or physical response a snake will feel threatened and therefore what to defend itself. If you are still, a snake is more likely to go straight past you, ignoring your presence as you are perceived not to be a threat.

  • KEEP CALM & DON’T INTERFERE

    Snakes can move with remarkable speed- whilst trying to protect or defend themselves. 95% of people who end up in hospital with snake bite are those who have tried interfering with the snake. On a short burst, a snake can move faster than a human & strike well above the knee line.

  • IF POSSIBLE

    Especially if the snake is in a building or home, try to seal off/block and or isolate the area where the snake is and try once again to keep a visual on its movements until a professional trained person arrives.
    For animals less than 30cm/12inches you may be able to isolate the animal by placing a flat rimed bucket or bin over the top of them on a flat surface if safe and confident to do so. This may be important to prevent the animal getting into inaccessible areas e.g. behind inbuilt carboards etc. Also by using a long-handled broom you may be able to gently and slowly sweep/encourage the animal into an open or safe area!

  • UPON ANY SUSPECTED SNAKE-BITE

    One should immediately apply first-aid and call for an ambulance on 000. All bites must be treated ASAP as a matter of urgency.

  • SLOW MOVEMENTS

    Once the snake/threat has moved on, slowly back away to a safe distance of 5 metres while trying to maintain an eye one the animal. Phone for assistance or call out for help as snakes are deaf, alert someone who can then make a call while you try maintaining a visual.

  • REMOVE

    Any children and pets from the danger slowly making sure they are isolated from the danger.

  • DON’T TRY TO KILL THE ANIMAL!

    Apart from placing yourself in danger it could well possibly be a harmless legless lizard which Australia has quite a few species of and at times sadly be mistaken for a snake.
    Australia has some of the world’s most venomous land snakes. The bite from an Eastern Brown Snake (which carries the 2nd most venomous bite in land snakes to date – worldwide) has caused fatality within under 15 minutes of said bite. Unlike you see in movies – 2 puncture marks may not be visible. There may be multiple puncture or scratch marks (as snakes have other teeth in their mouth & not just fangs), or it may be a slight scrape mark- hardly even visible to the naked eye just breaking the top surface of the skin & leaving a trace of venom to absorb through. Even when a snake is dead the venom crystalizes in the fang groove & remains toxic.

Know what you're looking at
brownsnake

Eastern Brown

also known as Common Brown

  • The Latin name for the Eastern Brown, Pseudonaja textilis, translates to “false cobra” due to the way the snake’s head flattens during a threat display
  • Found in a variety of habitats throughout eastern Australia.
  • Eastern Browns are currently responsible for the highest amount of snakebite-related fatalities in Australia, with as lethal bite that can kill in as little as fifteen minutes.
  • Carries the second most dangerous venom of land snakes world wide.
  • Can come in a variety of colour phases, including cream through to black, orange and silver.
  • The Eastern Brown is oviparous, laying up to thirty eggs which hatch between January and April, the hatchlings measuring about 22cms.
  • Will grow to an average length of 1.5m in Adelaide and surrounding areas, but has been found up to 2.4m.
  • The snake is diurnal and it’s most common food source is rodents, often found in residences all over Adelaide and surrounding areas.

Red-Bellied Black

Pseudechis porphyriacus

  • Featuring iridescent black scales on it’s back, the Red-Bellied Black’s most distinguishing feature are the redish scales on it’s belly.
  • Usually located near fresh waterways, where they’ll feed on amphibians yabbies, fish, birds and small mammals.
  • The red-Bellied Black snake is ovoviviparous, meaning the egg sacks hatch within the female, as it;s being laid or shortly after. Clutches range in size anywhere between five to forty young.
  • Grows to an average length of 1.5m, but has been found in excess of 2m.
  • The bite of this snake is not known to be fatal, but can cause loss of limb and serious secondary infections.
snake2
pygmy

Pygmy Copperhead

Austrelaps labialis

  • Most commonly a slate grey in appearance, with a distinctive creamish barring around the lips.
  • Usually associated with fresh water sources due to an amphibian and lizard based diet. Generally well hidden.
  • The Pygmy Copperhead is a rare and endangered species of snake, growing to about 75cm.

Eastern Tiger Snake

Notechis scutatus scutatus

  • Comes in a large variety of colours, and may be banded or unbanded
  • Was once responsible for the largest amount of fatal snakebites in Australia
  • Usually found around fresh water, where it feeds on frogs, ground & nesting birds, small mammals and lizards.
tiger
bluetonguelizard

Blue-Tongue Lizard

Tiliqua scincoides scincoides (Eastern)

  • Commonly found in the gardens of homes, feeding on snails, slugs, insects and soft fruits.
  • When threatened, the Blue-Tongue lizard sticks out it’s blue tongue hisses loudly puffing itself up. Although considered harmless, if provoked, the animal can inflict a painful bite.

Legless Lizards

  • Found in yards close to the hills and plains legless lizards feed on spiders and other insects. They’re often confused with juvenile snakes, if there’s any confusion about the identity of the animal you’re dealing with, please contact Snake-Away Services for professional advice.
leglesslizard
Myth Facts & Handy Hints
info2

Myths & Facts

  • Lizards don’t deter snakes – they’re more often a food source for a snake.
  • Some snakes are faster than a human in short bursts.
  • All snakes can swim exceptionally well.
  • A snake’s venom is only a modified form of their saliva used to kill and help digest it’s food, not to kill us.
  • Snakes shed their skin approximately every six to eight weeks depending on the frequency of feedings.
  • Snakes are NOT cold and slimy, they’re warm and silky to the touch.
  • Snakes are ectothermic.
  • All snakes are cold-blooded, they rely on the elements to control their body temperature.
  • If confronted in close proximity to a snake stand still and wait for the snake to move on, watching where it goes from a safe distance.
  • A snake has a forked tongue, whereas lizards (including legless lizards) have a single, broad, fleshy tongue and ears.

Handy Hints

  • Wear good leather gloves when gardening
  • Don’t put your hands where you can’t see
  • Stack firewood, iron and timber off the ground
  • Turn compost heaps regularly
  • Prevent rodents from breeding on your property
  • Keep lawns, grass and weeds cut to a minimum
  • Snakes will come out on warm nights, so use a torch when walking around your property
  • Move pet water bowls away from doorways
snake1
Charity

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